Catnip; Health Benefits & Growing Tips

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Catnip, specifically Nepeta Cataria, (There are over 250 varieties) is an aromatic perennial herb in the mint family. It is generally used by humans as a carminative (helps to expel gas) and as a gastric stimulant. It is “calming, relaxing, pain relieving, and gentle.” (Herbs for Children’s Health/HCH)

“Catnip is best known for its curious effect of cats. Most cats respond to its scent and taste with kitten-like behavior, drooling, sleepiness, purring, anxiety, and apparent excitement.” (West Coast Seeds.) The active ingredient that makes cats go crazy is called Nepetalactone. Interestingly about 1/3 of cats don’t respond at all to catnip; apparently it is genetic.

What it looks like

Catnip grows about 3 feet height and has a somewhat minty appearance (and ability to spread!)It has “Heart-shaped gray-green leaves and whorls of white flowers with purple spots.” (Prescription for herbal healing/ PHH) The flowers are little and not very showy.

How to start it

Want to grow this cat-attractant yourself? Catnip can either be planted from seed or obtained from a nursery or friend and planted directly in the ground. From seed, plant your Catnip indoors in February or March then transplant or plant seeds directly in April or May. Seeds should be sowed about 1/8 of an inch deep. At 70-80 Degrees F (Some sites said 60-70 F), the seeds should sprout in 10-20 days. A heat mat can help seeds germinate indoors.

How to Grow it

From what I have read, Catnip does not seem very picky. It is hardy to zone 4 and does well in any soil or pot with good drainage. It seems that your biggest problem will be keeping cats off it if you either have pet cats or feral cats around your house. Some people suggest getting 2 foot dowels and poking them in your plant 2-3 inches apart so cats cannot roll around and squish it. Others suggest making an 18″ arch of chicken wire over your little plant and letting the stems grow through the chicken wire to keep cats off it. I would also consider NOT planting it near somewhere you do not want cats, like a chicken house. On the other hand, some sites suggested planting it places where you do not want mice, like the edges of your garden. Think carefully before you plant it! Wherever you decide to, plant your Catnip 18-24 inches apart; plants spread by seed and by runners that spread underground, so they need some space in your garden. Through the season, pinch the stems and flowers off to keep the plant full and bushy. You can bring pots of catnip inside for your indoor cat, but it needs LOTS of light, so most people with indoor cats have multiple potted catnip plants that they cycle through so the cats can enjoy their catnip and the plants can enjoy the full benefit of being outdoors.

Companion Planting

Catnip attracts useful bugs such as parasitic wasps, pollinators, and lacewings, which control aphids among other types of pests. West Coast Seeds says that, “Catnip repels aphids, asparagus beetles, Colorado potato beetles, and squash bugs.” I am somewhat new to companion planting, but I think I will be planting my catnip in pots to tuck into my squash bed next year. Our squash bugs were so bad this year that we only got a couple butternut squash, and I would really like to contain the problem as naturally as possible in the future.

How to harvest it

Both the leaves and flowers from Catnip can be used. Most advice I read suggested harvesting the tops of the plant in the fall either right before or directly after they flower. However, Bonnie Plants says that you can cut the stems to harvest the leaves whenever you need them during the growing season. To store them, dry the leaves on the stems (Check out my article on drying herbs here), and strip the leaves off the stems. Discard the stems and save the crumbled leaves in a jar or plastic sealable bag.

What are the benefits of Catnip for people?

Like I said at the beginning of the article, Catnip is generally used for soothing digestive/gas issues and to calm and relax. It soothes digestive problems by increasing gastric secretions, which helps the body move infection & food out of the digestive tract.

Catnip also relaxes the body and induces sleep without causing negative side effects the next day. Is used to soothe children and help them sleep.

Interestingly, Herbs for Children’s Health calls this one of the best herbs to reduce childhood fevers. It is used to relieve pain and lower fever associated with teething by providing it as a tea through the day. (HCH) Some parents also soak a washcloth in catnip tea and freeze it to create a soothing chew toy for their teething baby to gnaw on. I know my 5 month old would love this right now!

Catnip is also traditionally used to prevent hives in children in Europe (PHH) It reduces the eruption of hives when suffering from measles or chicken pox. Definitely something to keep in the back of your mind before a chickenpox outbreak!

Other studies have shown that catnip is antimicrobial as well. (PHH)

How do you use Catnip to enjoy the benefits it has to offer?

Catnip is used as a tea/infusion or tincture. You can check out how to make an infusion and how to make a tincture for more information. For Catnip, use 1 tsp. of herb to 1 cup of boiling water. According to the Herb Book, don’t let the herb boil in the water, only steep. Take 1-2 cups per day for adults to sooth stomachs or to relax. Many people say that catnip doesn’t taste very good, which is probably why it is mixed with fennel to make a tea or gripe water so often. Fennel improves the taste and offers the same digestive soothing & calming properties that Catnip does. You can also make up a tincture and take 1/2 to 1 tsp at a time. Herbs for Children’s Healing says that a few drops of catnip tincture before meals can help with digestion and a few drops of tincture before bed will help to sooth a cranky child. Gripe water with catnip in it has been incredibly helpful for my family, especially when my 2 year old was very colicky as an infant. Check out this article to learn more about using herbs with babies & children.

Please feel free to share any experiences you have had with Catnip or any growing advice in the comments & click the photo below to pin to Pinterest!

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All About Rosemary

rosemaryRosemary. Woodsy. Romantic. Complex. I LOVE how Rosemary smells and have loved brushing against it as I run up and down the hill that my herb garden is tucked into. However, I have yet to actually learn what in the world to DO with the fragrant stalks I finally just harvested.

Part of me hesitates to harvest my plants because I don’t want to “waste” them. I have to keep reminding myself that NOT harvesting them is the waste, especially as winter approaches! So, in the spirit of using my resources fully, I would love to share with you all about Rosemary; growing it, cooking with it, and using it to stay healthy & sharp.

Planting Rosemary

The name Rosemary means “dew of the sea.” This lovely perennial is originally from the Mediterranean, but will grow happily anywhere it seems, as long as you meet its few needs. In warmer southern zones you can plant Rosemary in the fall & enjoy it year round. In colder climates you can either plant it in the ground & harvest before a frost or plant it in a pot & keep it mobile so you can bring it inside in the winter. I live in zone 7/6b so I am trying both. I have it planted in a nice sheltered area against my house and have taken a few cuttings to see if I can get them to root in a pot for winter enjoyment.

Growing Rosemary Outdoors

What does Rosemary like you ask? Botanical.com suggests growing rosemary in a light, rather dry soil in a sheltered location. This is the opposite of our windy, rocky, clay hill (that is the bane of my gardening existence.) I had to laugh because mine is growing very well in clay, though it is against a southern exposed wall somewhat protected from the wind.

Growing Rosemary Indoors

What to do in the winter? Here are a few tips I picked up for growing Rosemary inside. This fragrant evergreen needs lots of light, but not too much heat or humidity. This makes it an excellent houseplant for winter, especially since the woodstove tends to dry out the air in our house. Don’t go overboard with the watering either; too much water can cause powdery mildew. Dr. Mercola’s website suggests misting your plant with water a few times a week. I am really hoping that my cuttings take root in their pot & I will be able to enjoy them this winter (even if I can’t necessarily harvest them.)

Benefits of Rosemary

Now that we have covered the how of growing Rosemary we should move on to the why; what to do with your glorious harvest?

Rosemary is a good source of vitamins & minerals including iron, calcium, B-6 (medicalnews.com) vitamin A, Vitamin C, Folate, Manganese, and Magnesium. (organicfacts.net) It is also an excellent source of antioxidants. Medicinally, this herb has been used for centuries for an extremely wide variety of purpose, though the main purpose has probably been to improve mental sharpness.

Medicinal Uses . . .

  • Rosemary contains carnosic acid, which fights damage from free radicals and thus can help prevent memory loss. Just smelling rosemary is said to improve cognitive ability. Studies have been done that have shown that using Rosemary increases the quality of your memory, though not necessarily the speed of your memory.
  • Rosemary can also be used to improve your mood & zap stress, whether used aromatically, topically, or more intensively as an essential oil. (organicfacts.net)
  • It is also great for your stomach! Rosemary has been proven to fight the stomach bacteria H pylori and aid in the prevention of staph infections. Many cultures have used it to treat various stomach ailments from diarrhea to constipation.
  • It can also be used to relieve muscles aches when applied topically. In fact, Rosemary Essential oil has been approved to treat muscle pain and arthritis in Germany.
  • Additionally, it is reported that Rosemary can speed up the healing of wounds and bruises when applied to the skin. I would be willing to try this just because it smells so good!
  • Rosemary can help to relieve congestion when added to a steam treatment. Simply boil three cups of water and add the hot water to a bowl with a few sprigs of rosemary. Lean your face over the bowl, place a towel over your head to contain the steam, and inhale the aroma to clear your nasal passages.
  • Don’t forget about Rosemary’s antimicrobial properties either. Use a strong infusion of Rosemary and Clove to make a mouthwash. Using this will help to eliminate the nasty bacteria responsible for gum disease and tooth decay, and give you nice fresh breath! Rosemary oil can also be added to your regular toothpaste.

Side note; While rosemary is appealing to us, apparently it isn’t so attractive to bugs and rodents. Many folks have suggested using it to keep the insects away and tucking some sprigs in nooks and crannies to repel mice in your home. I just may try that in our basement this year.

Cooking with Rosemary

Of course, you don’t JUST use Rosemary for the health benefits, you add it to your cooking for the amazing flavor too! Rosemary is related to mint like many other herbs, but it is said to have a “warmer, bitter, more astringent flavor” (organicfacts.net)

  • One great idea I picked up was making a vinegar or olive oil infusion with Rosemary to add some pizzazz to recipes that normally would call for plain vinegar or oil. Rosemary olive oil could also be used for a dip for garlic bread or used as a salad dressing.
  • You can also make rosemary salt by layering sea salt over rosemary sprigs. Let them sit for a few days to a few weeks to infuse the Rosemary flavor into the salt, sift to remove the rosemary (or don’t worry about it.)
  • Rosemary is great addition to chicken and lamb, though I can’t say that I have tried it yet for venison. I really need to work on finding herbs to complement my husband’s hunting hobby. Rosemary seems to mix best with things that are already somewhat sweet including sweet potato, roast veggies, citrus, zucchini, etc.
  • For all my fellow bread lovers out there, consider mixing it into your bread dough for some extra interest. It not only will add some amazing flavor, but it looks beautiful as well. I am excited to add it to the recipe the next time I make pita bread then pair the pitas with some fresh hummus. Yum!

And there you have it; a quick primer on what I have learned about growing & using Rosemary. Please share & feel free to add any other ways you use this lovely herb in the comments below!

Chamomile: Benefits & Uses

chamomile” The finest and safest of all medicinals”

is how Chamomile is described by Rosemary Gladstar. What’s not to love about Chamomile? It’s has beautiful little daisy-like flowers that would look great in any garden, it’s gentle enough even for babies, and it has so many uses! It is “commonly used for

-stomach stress,

-digestive complaints,

– nervous system disorders,

-inflammation in the joints,

-wounds.” (Herbal Healing for Women)

Quite a list isn’t it! As I typed that out, it struck me; that list is a relatively accurate summary of Lyme disease complaints, which might be one reason I’ve enjoyed using it so much!

What makes Chamomile so effective? It’s anti-inflammatory properties and its positive effects on the nervous system and digestive system can apparently be traced in part to Azulene, an active chemical in Chamomile. This blue volatile oil has anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and anodyne properties. ( Herbal Healing for Women)

Using Chamomile

Chamomile has been used for hundreds of years by cultures across the globe, mainly as a tea, topical treatment for skin issues, and as a tincture. It is safe for pregnant mamas & can be used to treat morning sickness in combination with ginger. Wish I had known that a few months ago! It is also an excellent addition to skincare products; you will likely find it in many if not most natural products on the market. Apparently the flavenoids in Chamomile soak into the skin easily and protect it from free radical sun damage. Over the last few weeks I have experimented with using Chamomile as a relaxing drink while snuggling on the couch with my husband at night, adding it to my cough & cold remedy as we’ve battled sickness, and using it as a diaper rash spray on my toddler. I’ve also started a Chamomile tincture, though that has a few weeks before it will be ready. So far, I have not been disappointed with it! And I am definitely making a prominent spot for it in my garden this summer!

When making Chamomile tea, most sources recommend anywhere from 1-2 tablespoons of herb per cup of boiling water. Chamomile has bitter properties that tones the digestive system; these properties become more pronounces the longer it is steeped, so if you would like a strong , but bitter tea, steep for about 20 minutes. If you are looking for a more mild, relaxing tea, steep for only 5-10 minutes. Of course these numbers are not set in stone, and if you happen to forget about your tea for a long while like I do, I can assure you that it still tastes great and seems to have a positive effect!

While Chamomile has a plethora of uses for stomach issues, digestive issues, and use as an ingredient in skincare, I want to talk a bit about a use very close to my heart;

Using Chamomile for babies & children.

Having a toddler and a new little girl on the way I am always looking for herbs that are safe and effective for babies. Many sources have strongly recommended using Chamomile to treat colic and digestive issues in little ones. After using gripe water, which contains Chamomile as well as Fennel and Catnip, to treat colic in my daughter Elsie as a baby, I can happily confirm that this worked. It wasn’t a miracle drug by any means, but it definitely calmed her down and it felt so good to be able to do something for her besides nursing nonstop.

Rosemary Gladstar suggests using Chamomile baths, both for adults and children, to relax and sooth. Since Chamomile is so gentle, she even suggests using it in baby’s first bath to make it extra comforting. Now, it took me months and months to work up to being able to give my daughter a bath without having her scream in terror (we did a lot of snuggle-with-mama-while-she-sponges-you-off type of baths) , so this would not have been super helpful for us. However, if you have a baby who enjoys the warm water, this may be just the extra bit of relaxation you both need for those extra cranky days.

Another way to use Chamomile for little ones is as a teething remedy! The blog Growing up Herbal suggests using a Chamomile tincture both topically on the erupting tooth and internally to help sooth teething pain. Something natural and DIY that can effectively treat teething pain? Yes please! I literally did not even finish reading the article before I jumped up and ran into the kitchen to start my Chamomile tincture and am very much looking forward to trying this with my daughters in the future. For your reference, here is blog post I wrote about making tinctures. The average adult dose of Chamomile tincture is 30 drops; here is my post on safely calculating children’s doses based off of adult doses for your convenience.

The last way I have used Chamomile with my daughter is as a diaper rash spray. She was having tummy problems that consequently led to a very red, sore, irritated diaper area that traditional diaper cream and antibiotic ointment were not helping. Instead, I made a strong infusion of Chamomile and Calendula and put it into a little bottle to spray her with after wiping. I also used bentonite clay as a diaper powder to sprinkle on after the diaper spray. They worked wonders! No I didn’t take before & after pictures, and no I’m not sorry because I respect my child’s privacy, but it was incredible. We went from a red painful diaper area to perfectly clear in a day or two. Better yet, she actually LIKES getting her diaper changed now. Instead of a flailing, kicking maniac, she cooperates and even hands me her spray and her “sprinkles” (powder) and laughs while I use them. I call that a success.

I’ll be updating this post with our experience using Chamomile tincture for teething after we try it. In the meantime I want to encourage you to add this wonder herb to your collection and to your garden come spring! I’d love to hear of any other experiences you have had using Chamomile as well; I’m always looking for new ideas!

 

Echinacea; Benefits, Uses, & Doses

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Echinacea; your immune boosting super star!

This pretty purple herb is great for activating your immune system to fight colds, the flu, and respiratory issues. It’s safe for kids, and according to the Mayo clinic is safe for pregnant and nursing moms as well. This week after my husband’s entire extended family including us got a horrid stomach flu/ severe cold from being together on Christmas, I was REALLY WISHING that my Echinacea tincture was done already and I could load absolutely everyone up with some immune support. Sadly for me, it had only been 1 week since I made the tincture and I still needed another 1-5 weeks to bring it to full strength. Goes to show the benefit of being prepared!

Echinacea is a strong, potent perennial that everyone should have in their herbal apothecary. Even the traditional medical community used to value it very highly before the advent of antibiotics in the 50s. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, 13 separate European studies have found that when taken properly, Echinacea will reduce cold symptoms and shorten the duration of a cold. Continue reading

Tinctures: The Basics

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So what is a tincture?

The Prescription for Herbal Healing says that, “Tinctures are made by soaking an herb in alcohol. This causes the active constituents of the plant to dissolve, and gives the tincture a stronger action than teas or infusions.”

Tinctures are beneficial because they are much more concentrated, meaning it is easier to take or administer the amount of herbs you need for a treatment. For example, instead of trying to force down multiple cups of an infusion you can easily take a dropperful of tincture and carry on with your day. The downside is that you have can’t just whip up a batch of tincture like you can make a cup of tea; you have to plan ahead and wait 2-6 weeks for the alcohol to break down the plant suitably.

Technically, a tincture must have an alcohol base; anything else made with a glycerin or vinegar base is called an extract.

If you are morally opposed to the bit of alcohol in the tinctures, or are not comfortable taking them for any reason, you most definitely can substitute glycerin, which has the added benefit of being sweet without affecting blood sugar, or apple cider vinegar, which is healthy but not exactly palatable.

There are some benefits exclusively to alcohol however. According to wildernesscollege.com, alcohol will extract alkaloids, glycosides, minerals, essential oils, and other medical components that water (in an infusion) or glycerin will not. Alcohol also has the benefit of going directly into the blood stream, which obviously helps it to have a quicker affect. This is particularly helpful for treating things that need a quick response like relieving headaches or stopping bleeding. (The Herbal Apothecary)

Are Alcohol Tinctures Safe for Kids?

You may still be wondering, “Great . . . for me as an adult, but what about my toddlers or children?” I was wondering the same thing until I came across this AMAZING article on growingupherbal.com that explains perfectly why it is safe to use alcohol tinctures with your children. She explains it clearly, makes some excellent points, and will set your mind at ease without feeling pushy. She shares her reasoning based on the benefits of using an alcohol base, common foods our kids already may be eating that have notable levels of alcohol in them, just how very very very little alcohol they are actually consuming, and what a professional herbalist has to say on the subject. Basically, the gist of it is that in her mind the benefits outweigh the risks, common foods our kids go crazy about like bananas, orange juice, and fermented foods have more alcohol than a dose of tincture would, and then gives an example using the conversion formulas that shows you will find that a 70lb. 10 year old would be ingesting the equivalent of less than 1% of the maximum dosage of alcohol for his/her size when taking a dose of tincture.

If you are still concerned about the amount of alcohol in your tincture, you can evaporate much of the alcohol out by placing the dose in a hot tea and serving once it has cooled, according to growingupherbal.com

At this point my husband and I have decided that we would not give an alcohol based tincture to a baby just because it is more concentrated and we are trying to follow the principle that gentler is better for little ones. However after learning just how little the tincture dosages are for toddlers, and how to further eliminate some alcohol, we feel that we would be comfortable giving necessary amounts to our children from toddlers on up. (Especially seeing just how many bananas our daughter already eats!) Obviously this is something that you must talk over with your own family and come to your own decision that you will be comfortable acting on.

Once you have decided to go for it and lay in a supply of tinctures, what are some basic things you’ll need to know?

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For anyone still wondering, the process for making a tincture is ridiculously simple. Almost as simple as taking your herbs out of storage, admiring them, and putting them back (which I have to admit to doing sometimes!)It is also not an exact science, which bothered me when I first began researching tinctures, but which I can now appreciate because of the flexibility you have in tailoring recipes to suit your needs. You will need . . .

Supplies:

-an appropriately sized glass jar (I’ve been using pint jars) and a lid,

– some 80 proof vodka,

-your herbs

– some patience.

Process:

– First you fill your mason jar up with the appropriate amount of herb, which will vary whether you are using fresh or dried herbs. See my guidelines below to help you determine how much to use (this is the “not exact science” part!)

-Next, fill the jar up to the shoulder with your 80 proof alcohol and tighten the lid on.

– Label it with what herb it is, what proportion of herb to alcohol you used, and when you started it. You may think you will remember these details, but trust me, once your pantry starts filling up with little jars of chopped weedy looking things, you will be glad you wrote down the details!

-Next find a dark place to store it for 2-6 weeks. If you remember, try to give the bottle a good shake every day to keep everything covered and well mixed. This is a good part for your kids to help with if you want to involve them!

– After 2-6 weeks, strain the tincture into a fresh container, store it away, and don’t forget about it or be afraid to use it when you need it!

Guidelines:

Alcohol: What kind of alcohol should you buy? According to Mountain Rose Herbs, 40 to 50% pure alcohol (which is the same as 80-90 proof Vodka) is standard. They say that a higher alcohol percentage is better when using more high-moisture herbs and will pull out more volatile oils. We bought 80 proof vodka to make our tinctures from. However, because he couldn’t find plain vodka, my husband bought one bottle of vanilla flavored (smells AMAZING) and one bottle of mango flavored, so our tinctures will have a little extra pizzazz to them!

If you purchase The Herbal Apothecary by JJ Pursell, she includes a great list on pages 221-224 of individual herbs and what percentage of solvent they need.

Herbs: The amount of herb you use is also obviously important; I was very pleased to find some general guidelines on Mountain Rose Herb’s website that can be applied to whichever herb you are working into a tincture.

Fresh leaves & flowers; fill the jar 2/3 to 3/4 full of chopped herbs.

Dried leaves & flowers; fill the jar 1/2 to 2/3 full of herbs.

Fresh roots, bark, and berries; fill the jar 1/3 to 2/3 full.

Dried roots, bark, and berries; only fill the jar 1/4 to 1/3 full because they will expand.

In conclusion, I’ve noted some of the benefits of tinctures, some of the possible concerns involved with using tinctures, basic guidelines for using herbs in tinctures, and the very easy process for making a tincture. So far I have made an echinacea tincture for beating colds, a chamomile tincture to help with teething, and will be making a nettle tincture to use as a tonic & replenish minerals, and give us an energy boost.

Now I want to encourage you to start thinking ahead to what health concerns your family may encounter in the future and prepare some tinctures so you are ready to meet any common health issues head on!

 

 

Creating a Herbal Notebook

dsc_1054Creating a Herbal Notebook

I want to share with you an exciting tool I’ve put together to wrangle all the new information we are gathering about herbs; a Herb Notebook! I’ll share the benefits & purposes of an herb notebook, break down each category I have included and give ideas for filling each section, post photos of my own notebook in progress, and

best of all, I have included FREE printables of the beautiful title pages I designed for each section for you to start your own notebook.

Why Maintain a Herb Notebook?

Continue reading

Fennel: Benefits, Uses, & Concerns

fennelFennel. Delicious, aromatic, soothing, and a Godsend to anyone with a colicky baby.

Fennel seeds have been described as one of the best herbs to use for digestive issues. It is safe enough to use for cranky babies yet gently effective enough to be described as nature’s Pepto Bismal. It is an antacid that neutralizes excessive amounts of acid in the stomach. (Herbs for Children’s Health) The seeds can be ground and made into a tea, infused into an oil to rub on irritated tummies, or taken as a tincture.

What do these little licorice scented seeds do? Prepare to be amazed . . .

Continue reading

New Week New Recipe: Elderberry Syrup

elderberry-syrup-recipeMonday is a day for fresh beginnings, tackling everything you ignored to spend time with your family on the weekend, and making new plans. My plan, especially as the cold sets in and winter is officially upon us, is to figure out how to prevent my family and myself from getting the flu bugs and colds that are going around. That means trying a new recipe!

Cue the Elderberry Syrup!

What is Elderberry Syrup, you ask? Continue reading

Herbal Preparations

herbal-preparationsThere are so many different ways to prepare herbs, it can be overwhelming to find a place to begin! Do you pop some pills, down a tea, take a dropper-full of a tincture . . .  so many options! Your decision how to use your herbs will depend on how strong of a concentration you need (teas are weakest, then infusions, then tinctures are stronger), whether this is for long term maintenance (a tea would be better) or short term symptom relief (tincture every few hours) what part of the plant you are using, and of course, personal preference ( I HATE tea) Here are a few different kinds of preparation along with their pros and cons. Continue reading

Face your fears to use your herbs

face your fears

Why don’t you use herbs in your daily life more often? For me, it’s because I’m afraid. Afraid to waste money, afraid to invest time in something that really won’t work, and most irrationally, afraid to poison myself!

Well, today that is changing! I want to encourage you to be bold! Be brave! And, most importantly, be smart!

People talk about a healthy fear, but your fear of using herbs wrongly is not healthy if it keeps you from jumping in and trying. Rather, what is healthy is a wholesome respect for herbs. They are powerful. This is where being smart comes in. Know what herbs will be harmful for you personally (I’ll be posting about contraindications next.) Be smart in what you purchase; obviously if you don’t have anything personally harmful to you or your family in your herb collection, the risk of causing harm is much lower. Most importantly, learn, learn learn! Make it your goal to learn what an herb can treat, how to prepare it, proper dosing, etc before you even bring it into your home. Then you can be much more confident in using it. How do you gain all this information?   Continue reading